All posts tagged ramblings

Well – this is how low politicians can go – 5G does not exist in any shape form etc. yet – so he may as well promise zero calories sugar by the same date….

Mayor promises 5G mobile network across London by 2020
Monday, July 28, 2014 @ 6:19am

London will be one of the first major cities in the world to be covered by a 5G mobile Internet service, the city’s mayor has pledged, among other connectivity claims. Mayor Boris Johnson revealed the city is working with the University of Surrey to develop part of the capital’s long-term infrastructure investment plan, which should lead to the 5G mobile network being deployed by 2020.

[From MacNN | Mayor promises 5G mobile network across London by 2020]

From https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bistro-the-smart-feeder-that-recognizes-your-cat-s-face

The world’s smartest feeder that can track appetite and weight change for each one of your kitties with innovative cat facial recognition technology.

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A very sensible BT engineer turned up to have a look at the cause behind the intermittent noise we have had on our ADSL line.

And he found that a lid had come off a junction box up a pole, and let rain in!

The noise profile looks better just now – long may it stay that way!

Having spent some time in California (and in Las Vegas) I was aware of the rather serious state of their water supplies over the last few years, and it does not seem to be getting any better :

The heat is on, in more ways than one, as California staggers toward a third drought-plagued summer that will probably include rationing and lots of fighting about how the state should use its precious, dwindling supplies of water.

The snow levels in the Sierra were only 18 percent of average on Thursday, when the last of the season’s once-a-month measurements was taken by the California Department of Water Resources. That’s worse than last month, when the snowpack was 32 percent of normal for the date.

[From California drought: Sierra snowpack is barely there – SFGate]

UPDATE: 8-april-2014. – no delivery of this item today. Hm!

————–

I had a reply from Amazon after my earlier phone call – and it leaves me a bit confused

———–

Hello,

I’m sorry for any inconvenience caused by the change to your delivery estimate.

When you make certain changes to an order via Your Account, our system tries to determine the best fulfillment plan for your order given the new information. Sometimes, this results in a change to the expected dispatch and delivery dates for the order.

Your order has been dispatched today and as you have chosen One day delivery It should have arrived for tomorrow 8 April 2014 though estimated delivery date will be on 10 April 2014.

AS mentioned it is only estimated where in any case that there would be any delays.

I hope this helps. We look forward to seeing you again soon.

————–

As I made not changes to “Your account” I’m not sure what they refer to?

And I have no real idea why a “one day delivery” system would estimate delivery to take 3 days?

Last but not least I have absolutely no idea what the last sentence “AS mentioned it is only estimated where in any case that there would be any delays” really means.

To be hones I feel that Prime is still a really good system, and that we have to expect he occasional hiccup. The human element here lets the system down a bit though.

At long last someone does certification for Drupal.

Acquia certification for Drupal
I’m proud to share that Acquia announced its certification program today. You can now get “Acquia certified” in Drupal development, something I’m pretty excited about.

This is something I’ve been hoping to see in the community. While there have been other experiments around certification, we as a community have lacked a way to ensure professional standards across Drupal. Over the years, I’ve heard the demand coming from partners and clients who need a way to evaluate the skills of people on their teams. More and more, that demand has drowned out any perceived criticisms of a certification for Drupal.

A good certification is not just a rubber stamp, but a way for people to evaluate their own abilities, and make plans for improving their knowledge. In some countries, certification is really important to create a career path (something I learned when visiting India). For these reasons, I feel Drupal’s growth and development has been hindered without a formal certification in place.

[From Acquia certification for Drupal | Dries Buytaert]

But the reactions from the Open Source community have been quite mixed – as the closest you have really managed to get so far is to be a contributor to the core project (or a module of course).

But then again this is the really good part of the open source movement, you get quick reactions and in among these there is always some thought through arguments.

My take is that it is a good thing for certain countries and for developers starting out – but of considerably less use for seasoned Drupal developers.

Let’s see how it takes off!

Congratulations to Aquia!

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The note under the sign itself states : “Valid for the whole of Svalbard”

I’m helping a friend who has been the victim of a scam (Look up Ketones in Google) – and found that the company never sent out any order confirmation including this information :

Information required prior to the conclusion of the contract

7.  (1)  Subject to paragraph (4), in good time prior to the conclusion of the contract the supplier shall—

(a)provide to the consumer the following information—
(i)the identity of the supplier and, where the contract requires payment in advance, the supplier’s address;
(ii)a description of the main characteristics of the goods or services;
(iii)the price of the goods or services including all taxes;
(iv)delivery costs where appropriate;
(v)the arrangements for payment, delivery or performance;
(vi)the existence of a right of cancellation except in the cases referred to in regulation 13;
(vii)the cost of using the means of distance communication where it is calculated other than at the basic rate;
(viii)the period for which the offer or the price remains valid; and
(ix)where appropriate, the minimum duration of the contract, in the case of contracts for the supply of goods or services to be performed permanently or recurrently;
(b)inform the consumer if he proposes, in the event of the goods or services ordered by the consumer being unavailable, to provide substitute goods or services (as the case may be) of equivalent quality and price; and
(c)inform the consumer that the cost of returning any such substitute goods to the supplier in the event of cancellation by the consumer would be met by the supplier.
(2) The supplier shall ensure that the information required by paragraph (1) is provided in a clear and comprehensible manner appropriate to the means of distance communication used, with due regard in particular to the principles of good faith in commercial transactions and the principles governing the protection of those who are unable to give their consent such as minors.

(3) Subject to paragraph (4), the supplier shall ensure that his commercial purpose is made clear when providing the information required by paragraph (1).

[From The Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000]

If any of this is missing they have a problem.

How are you going to deal with 2 cats that ned attention at the same time as you want to be on your computer

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Harvard Business Review seems to have seen the light – the traditional way for consultancy companies to work is no longer valid, they have to innovate to stay profitable, i.e. to exist:

We have come to the conclusion that the same forces that disrupted so many businesses, from steel to publishing, are starting to reshape the world of consulting. The implications for firms and their clients are significant. The pattern of industry disruption is familiar: New competitors with new business models arrive; incumbents choose to ignore the new players or to flee to higher-margin activities; a disrupter whose product was once barely good enough achieves a level of quality acceptable to the broad middle of the market, undermining the position of longtime leaders and often causing the “flip” to a new basis of competition.

[From Consulting on the Cusp of Disruption – Harvard Business Review]

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