All posts tagged development

Brandon is the CEO of Riot Games (where I used to work) – and a really good guy:

The game industry is undergoing the most dynamic period in its history and your teams must be prepared to adapt to a barrage of new challenges at an ever-growing rate. Traditional, “built-in” strategic advantages such as branded IP, publishing/distribution leverage, and technology no longer have the same strangle hold they once did in determining the success of your games. Ultimately, at Riot Games we have found that great people are the most important driver of the success of games. People make critical strategic, design, technology and business decisions.

People also navigate the one constant that arises in game development – unforeseen challenges. We have found that there is rarely a better investment than in cultivating and refining your talent pool. This talk will explore the impact people have on the success of video games. We will explore core concepts like how do you build a self-sustaining system for attracting and retaining the best talent ? What core philosophies help ensure consistent success? How do you maintain a culture while rapidly growing a company? How do you design an environment where people can create the absolute highest quality work? How do you recruit exceptional talent from other industries?

[From Brandon Beck Keynote: “Navigating Unforeseen Challenges – Why Leveling Up Your Talent Pool is Key to Min-Maxing Your Studio” – design3]

Wow – this guy has made a driver board for 10W LED’s – that should be incredibly bright, and he is thinking about making it possible to drive them from a FadeCandy board.

A big part of the C.A.R.D.L.E desk lamps will be the actual lamps. Rather than using incandescent or halogen bulbs, they are full-color high-power LED light engines. I took the liberty of designing a custom driver board that can support 3 channels (red green and blue) which can be combined for any particular color. The actual driver chip is insanely small: it’s a 3mm x 3mm package.

After considering a wide variety of possible driver chips, I chose the Maxim MAX16819 for a number of reasons including external PWM control and an external drive transistor, meaning it can handle arbitrarily high currents. (Only after a pretty exhaustive search did I find this great chart comparing LED drivers. Wish I had seen that earlier!) These are pretty beefy and can drive something like 30 watts depending on the LEDs chosen. I’m using these 10-watt multichip RGB LEDs from DealExtreme

[From Untitled]

Interesting – some time ago they were adamant that they did not need any more funding, and were cash positive. But that has apparently changed.

I’ll start with the big stuff: Automattic is raising $160M, all primary, and it’s the first investment into the company since 2008. This is obviously a lot of money, especially considering everything we’ve done so far has been built on only about $12M of outside capital over the past 8 years. It was also only a year ago I said “Automattic is healthy, generating cash, and already growing as fast as it can so there’s no need for the company to raise money directly — we’re not capital constrained.”

[From New Funding for Automattic | Matt Mullenweg]

UPDATE – I was wrong – read the definition of length wrongly.

—————

I seem to have found a bug in the OPC driver that came along with the FadeCandy software – look at the “SendFirmwareConfigPacket: source – packet[3] is wrong – it should be 9 – not 5, as the length of the packet is otherwise wrong. I will report.

// Send a packet with the current firmware configuration settings

void sendFirmwareConfigPacket()

{

if (output == null) {

// We’ll do this when we reconnect

return;

}

byte[] packet = new byte[9];

packet[0] = 0; // Channel (reserved)

packet[1] = (byte)0xFF; // Command (System Exclusive)

packet[2] = 0; // Length high byte

packet[3] = 5; // Length low byte

packet[4] = 0x00; // System ID high byte

packet[5] = 0x01; // System ID low byte

packet[6] = 0x00; // Command ID high byte

packet[7] = 0x02; // Command ID low byte

packet[8] = firmwareConfig;

I seem to have found a bug in the OPC driver that came along with the FadeCandy software – look at the “SendFirmwareConfigPacket: source – packet[3] is wrong – it should be 9 – not 5, as the length of the packet is otherwise wrong. I will report.

// Send a packet with the current firmware configuration settings

void sendFirmwareConfigPacket()

{

if (output == null) {

// We’ll do this when we reconnect

return;

}

byte[] packet = new byte[9];

packet[0] = 0; // Channel (reserved)

packet[1] = (byte)0xFF; // Command (System Exclusive)

packet[2] = 0; // Length high byte

packet[3] = 5; // Length low byte

packet[4] = 0x00; // System ID high byte

packet[5] = 0x01; // System ID low byte

packet[6] = 0x00; // Command ID high byte

packet[7] = 0x02; // Command ID low byte

packet[8] = firmwareConfig;

Further details on the “TDD is dead” – I will really have to read this in detail, as I have this nagging feeling that he has a valuable core message.

It’s from this unfortunate maxim that much of the test-induced design damage flows. Such damage is defined as changes to your code that either facilitates a) easier test-first, b) speedy tests, or c) unit tests, but does so by harming the clarity of the code through — usually through needless indirection and conceptual overhead. Code that is warped out of shape solely to accomodate testing objectives.

Faithful TDD’ers will reject the mere suggestion that this is possible. A true believer sees only good coming from the above-mentioned concessions to testing. It’s under this cloud of judgment that TDD has been rammed down people’s throats as the savior of professional programming. And it’s under this regime that the current “TDD is dead” uprising is bred.

[From Test-induced design damage (DHH)]

My first test of using FadeCandy to run a Adafruit Neopixel ring looks like this

201404302112.jpg

and it shows all the standard Fadecandy demos – so I seem to have connected most things correctly.

Now on to write my own code.

Dave Winer about ageism in todays IT

I signed up for the EmpireJS conference in May here in NYC. At the time there were no speakers announced. They promised to announce one every day until the roster filled out. And of course, no surprise really — they’re all very young. I’m sure they know a lot about JavaScript, but surely there are some more experienced older people who also know about this great language?

[From [Scripting News]: Home]

Btw. – I do not feel that there is much ageism in the parts of IT that I have worked in….

I’ve been testing a new email client – Airmail.

So far it looks really good – but I have a few interesting issue – including this rather cryptic message when trying to create a event :

201404130929.jpg

Interesting alpha version of a new book for Ruby developers wanting to use a IOS fronted:

iOS on Rails (Beta)
The reference for writing superb iOS apps with Ruby on Rails backends.
Once it comes out of Beta, this book will sell for $39. Get it now for just $29.

Read a free sample
This book is really two books in one.

The the first book covers building a backend API in Rails. We will demonstrate how to create a robust, clean, flexible JSON API. Along the way, we’ll discuss different approaches that we didn’t choose and discuss their drawbacks.

[From thoughtbot Learn : iOS on Rails (Beta): a book by thoughtbot]

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