All posts in IOT

After we installed a new boiler and a 10 port manifold to control our (waterborne) I needed to find out which heating loop from the manifold went where without spending weeks on my knees turning loops on and off manually, and then wandering around barefoot to find out which part of the floor was affected.

So I decided to put temperature sensors on every loop and a few other strategic points in the heating system.

So far I have 16 temperature sensors (DS18B20 sensors) controlled by 2 Raspberry pi Zero’s.

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Why 2 Raspberry pi Zeros? – Well I ran into problems when I went above 10 sensors on the first raspberry Pi Zero, and decided to see if I could solve this part of the puzzle – as (for all I knew) there was a software or bandwidth limit stopping me at 10 sensors.

The DS18B20 uses a rather ingenious protocol called 1Wire, which enables a “multi drop” configuration of sensors originating from one set of wires. It can be run with 2 wires (parasitic power) or 3 wires (plus, round and data wires). I went for the last one – as using parasitic power sensed one step too far for me. So I used a breadboard attached to the Raspberry pi to make it easier to experiment.

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I have had quite a few problems with this – even though the circuit is simple :

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I’m using a bit more of a “star” configuration, as each sensor has approx 1m of cable connected to it.

I had a number of problems where the Raspberry Pi’s stopped working at “random” intervals – and lot of experiments with resistor values, swapping of power supplies and so on did not sort the problem out.

The solution to the problem (for me in this particular case) turned out to be the wireless connection to the LAN, as soon as I put a access point close to the Raspberry Pi;s – all stability issues of this type went away!

(More about the setup later)

This is a test to check my WordPress setup on a new server – sorry.

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Just started a new brew on Saturday afternoon/evening, at now it’s bubbling away merrily.

I have attached the newest birthday gadget to the brewing bucket – my electronic water-lock PLAATO.

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As you can see from the picture it’s powered with a standard USB micro cable, and it’s got WiFi built in to store all the data in the cloud – on the accompanying App it looks like this :

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The green line is counting the number of bubbles going through the air-lock.

All very exciting – but there were a few gremlins to fight to get it all working. If you look at the line there were very few bubbles before 17:00. In reality there were lot of bubbles before 17:00, they just did not register properly.

For those of you that are home brewers yourself – you will notice that the temperature is quite low. This is because I have yet to find my heating belt for the fermentor. (-;

This is from outside in Milford, Surrey in the UK today.

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Actually – the curve is for the whole of October – but for today it looks like this on SmartCitizen.

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The link to this sensor is : https://smartcitizen.me/kits/9599

I’ve just had my birthday presents – and the one I had wished for turned up today. And it’s beer brewing related!

It was time to get rid of the old airlock – and replace it with a Plaato. And it’s of course WiFI connected to a app on my IoS devices.

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And on top of everything it’s made in Norway!

I’ll report back here when I get it charged and do a brew,

We have a SmartCitizen node in one of our courtyards (https://smartcitizen.me/kits/9599) which gies us cute a lot of data – including the all important laser based dust sensors – look it up.

 

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